If you are lucky enough to encounter a piece of homebrew electronics from the 1950s, the

If you are lucky enough to encounter a piece of homebrew electronics from the 1950s, the chances are that under the covers the components will be assembled on solder tags, each component with long leads, and chassis-mounted sockets for tubes. Easy to assemble with the most agricultural of soldering irons. Open up a home build from the 1960s or early 1970s, and you might find the same passive components alongside germanium transistors mounted through holes in a curious widely spaced stripboard or even a home-made PCB with chunky wide tracks. By the late 1970s and early 1980s you would find a more familiar sight. Dual-in-line ICs through-hole on 0.1″ spaced stripboard, and home-made PCBs starting to appear on fibreglass board. Easy to use, easy to solder. Familiar. Safe. Exactly what you’ll see on your breadboard nearly forty years later, and still what you’ll see from a lot of kit manufacturers. But we all know that progress in the world of electronic components has not stood still. Surface-mount components have a history going back to the 1960s, and started to appear in consumer equipment from the end of the 1980s. More components per square inch, smaller, cheaper devices. Nowa...

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Cookies enable us to provide the best experience possible and help us understand how visitors use our website. By browsing Filtration + Separation, you agree to our use of cookies. At the FILTECH exhibition and conference visitors to the GKD stand were shown the company’s three-dimensional Porometric mesh, flow-optimised mesh type OT6 and a procedure for the simulation of the bubble point test. Based on the findings of a study conducted jointly with the Texan energy concern ConocoPhillips into the erosion behaviour of filter media in well pipes, GKD has developed a three-dimensional porometric mesh type with rectangular pores. Compared with conventional constructions, this development, based on the YMAX product range, has a lower weight of the weave, which has been achieved through modification of its construction and so should give lower costs. The company claims that the higher porosity of the multi-layered mesh construction reduces local pore velocity by up to 40%, compared to the performance of standard twilled or plain dutch weaves currently available on the market, while maintaining a constant volume flow rate. This means that the throughput increases by a similar factor. ...

The 24-Oz Yeti Rambler Review PM_Logo PM_Logo PM_Logo

Hard-shelled Yeti coolers have become an icon of summertime fun, posting up on the beach or the boat with a chest full of frosty Coronas to help you channel your inner Dom Toretto. But let’s say your scene is the campground, sitting around a fire with a high-end hoppy brew in one hand. Now Yeti has you covered for that, too. This spring, the outdoor brand rolled out the 24-ounce Rambler mug, an extension of Yeti’s line of insulated drinkware. This one is all about leaning back with a healthy volume of your favorite brew. The mug is made of kitchen-grade 18/8 stainless steel and is double-walled to create vacuum insulation, which will keep your hands warm and your cold beer cold. The “Quadgrip” handle feels robust enough to carry 24 ounces of liquid and fits comfortably into your grip. A cup like this demands thorough testing. So, through gritted teeth, we fulfilled our reviewing duty filled it up with cold beer to see what the Rambler could handle. Indeed, the mug swallows two 12-oz. bottles of IPA if you’re patient enough for the head to settle and willing to sip a little off the top. (A Foster’s oil can won’t quite fit, of course). 3d...

What makes up my cycling clothing? Polartec talks fabric science

Breathability, waterproofing and temperature regulation; when it comes to cycling clothing you can choose three. No, really, the holy grail of clothing manufacture exists, says textiles giant Polartec. Here the maker of your favourite brand’s cycling garments talk us through what’s on offer to the modern rider… Whether you’re familiar with the name or not, there’s a good chance you’ve worn Polartec garments before now, be it a cycling garment or indeed any technical item designed for the outdoors. Polartec is the Versa Capital-owned fabrics giant now charged with creating the inner workings for garments from the likes of Rapha, Patagonia, The North Face, Castelli, Santini, Sportful, Mavic and countless others. With over 400 different fabrics stemming from the business, the history goes much deeper. Having started in 1908, the business originally made wool uniforms for the United States army from its then Massachusetts headquarters. Most notable of those 400+ fabric innovations is the creation of fleece, first developed in the 1980s by the research and development team at the former mills. That premises unfortunately burned to the ground in 1995, an incident that stalled the comp...

Top 10 reasons why electric scooters are a great addition to Charlottesville

Have you ever realized that walking just isn’t your mojo? Need to get somewhere quickly? Consider renting an electric scooter — with the main player being the Lime scooters. These beefed-up Razor scooters zoom through the streets with a top speed of 15 mph. Now your walk between classes becomes an adventure of epic proportions as you zip around cars and become a hazard to all pedestrians. In order to use a Lime, you first need to download their app. The app includes built-in maps, making these awesome sets of wheels extremely easy to find. Whether one is in the O’Hill lobby or snuggled up against the beloved UBikes, it is almost impossible not to have one within reach. For a small starting payment around $1  — and per-minute charges of less than 25 cents — you can be cruisin’ with the squad on an electric scooter. This will barely hurt your wallet, and you can only pay with a card through the app. Bonus points if you use your parent’s credit card. Limes are real party pleasers. With the scooters’ promise of fast transportation and a good time, they are the center of attention. The distinct color schemes of each scooter evokes a different — and uniquely fun — feeling. The w...

Global Aluminium Alloy Wire Market 2019 Research Report – Baotou Aluminium, Vedanta, Vimetco, UC RUSAL, Southwire, Hongfan

Global Aluminium Alloy Wire 2019 Market research report highlights projection of business, market growth and challenges, new innovations and opportunities, market size, trends, strategies, future roadmap and forecast to 2025 The Aluminium Alloy Wire 2019 market report includes data that has been analyzed in an orderly manner, dividing the market into different segments  taking into account the type of products and services provided by the market, regional analysis, product applications, and market structure. Aluminium Alloy Wire 2019 market , presents detailed information on the major competitors Baotou Aluminium , Vedanta , Vimetco , UC RUSAL , Southwire , Hongfan , Lincoln Electric , Kaiser Aluminum , Alro , Hydro , ACL Cables , Liljedahl Winding Wire , Sourn Cable , , formally developed as well as development associations with a significant market value in terms of sales, size,  share, demand, supply, manufacture analysis, and demand ratio. The Aluminium Alloy Wire 2019 market report includes the latest mechanical enhancements and new releases to design, settle on instructed business decisions, and complete their future required executions. Zonal evolution structures and pro...

ELLWOOD CITY, Pa. – With all of its complexities, diverse business subsidiaries and integrated operations –

ELLWOOD CITY, Pa. – With all of its complexities, diverse business subsidiaries and integrated operations – plus tens of millions of dollars in new investment throughout the corporation – Ellwood Group Inc. remains at heart a down home family business, much like it was in when the company was founded here more than 100 years ago. In the years since, the company has expanded to 29 facilities across five states, Mexico and Canada and employs 2,000. But it has no intention of losing that tight-knit family approach, executives say. “I’m the fifth generation to work in the company,” says Anna Barensfeld, vice president of strategic initiatives at Ellwood. “I realized we had something special in the family business and I wanted to get involved in it. I wanted to keep that going.” Today, the operation consists of 10 divisions branded under the Ellwood umbrella. The 29 plants include manufacturing and distribution businesses that vertically integrate company operations. Among its products and services are mold casting, steelmaking, open-die and closed die forging, crankshaft forging and machining, research and development, and distribution. “Growth has skyrocketed,” Barensfeld reports. ...

The movers, shakers and surprising omissions in Tom Sietsema’s fall dining guide

Like French wine from the cellar at Marcel’s or the 100-day kimchi at Anju, Tom Sietsema’s fall dining guides get better with age. The 20th edition contains reviews of 77 restaurants — the largest number ever. In addition to numerous shake-ups in the annual list of his Top 10 personal favorites, Sietsema has added another restaurant to his Hall of Fame, created a new category called “Classics” to honor restaurants that have stood the test of time, and bestowed a coveted three-and-a-half-star review on a restaurant that has never before appeared in the fall dining guide. The previous five fall dining guides have contained between 37 and 53 reviews of area restaurants. (The 2016 edition had 52 Sietsema reviews, plus 10 cheap eats recommendations by Tim Carman and a list of D.C.’s top 10 bars chosen by yours truly.) Sietsema chose to visit more restaurants this time because “20 years is a milestone of sorts,” he explains. “The guide merited being bigger, because I had more I wanted to say in my introduction and more people and events I wanted to flag” in smaller sections looking back at his tenure. “This anniversary issue gave me a chance to look back and salute all the good ...