After moving from a Yorkville studio into a co-op apartment in Tudor City’s Windsor Tower in 1992, Jim Taylor didn’t give much thought to his new living arrangement. He admits it straight-up: “I didn’t know anything about co-ops.”  Then some of Windsor Tower’s seven board members started urging Taylor, an architect, to consider serving with them. The personalities and philosophy of the board were in flux. “The old boards put off what they could put off,” Taylor says. “The board members said they needed an architect who could help advise them. Eventually I gave in – and I found I love having input and helping improve the building.”  Since Taylor joined the board in 2006, some impressive improvements have come to the 1920s-vintage Windsor Tower, a 26-story, 800-unit building, one of 12 that make up the bucolic oasis of Tudor City near the East River in midtown Manhattan. At the moment, the board is supervising a three-year capital project to repair the facade and – far more interesting – replicate or repair the terra-cotta details that make these landmarked, neo-Gothic buildings some of the most arresting in the city. Rather than pinch pennies, the Windsor Tower board decided to ...