Hamilton, Ohio — After four years of secrecy, Procter & Gamble Co. is pulling back the veil on its Imflux process — an injection molding technology that uses low, constant pressure to fill the mold, controlled by software and pressure sensors in the mold and the nozzle. “It’s a low, no-hesitating, constant pressure,” said Gene Altonen, chief technology officer of Imflux. Altonen, a 27-year veteran of P&G and an injection molding expert, said: “Imflux is making real-time adjustments for viscosity shifts, whether it’s the material, the temperature or something in the mold. It is going to make these changes in real time, which gives you a more stable process.” Imflux stands standard injection molding on its head — with its tradition of high-speed, high-pressure injection and the crossover point to pack-and-hold. “We do these phases of the process simultaneously. We’re filling and we’re packing and we’re cooling all simultaneously. And because we’re doing that, when we finish filling the mold, it’s basically a done part,” Altonen said. A thicker part may need some additional cooling, but that is dr...