Yoplait is one of the world's largest and most famous yogurt brands—it's available in more than 50 countries and has offered creamy and delicious yogurts since the 1960s. With products such as Yoplait Whips, Go-Gurt, Yoplait Greek 100, and Plenti, Yoplait is known for its wide variety of flavors, far from the standard vanilla and strawberry. Dessert-centric options like Boston cream, sea salt caramel, and cheesecake work to get consumers to consider yogurt as snacks and non-breakfast meals. Below, we've whipped up some facts you might not know about the brand.

In 1964, six regional French dairy cooperatives joined forces to create and sell yogurt and other products on a national scale. The six co-ops, consisting of 100,000 French dairy farmers, merged to create one company called Sodima. By the following year, Sodima was ready to debut their signature yogurt, which they named Yoplait after two of the most well-known member co-ops, Yola and Coplait.

Yoplait's current logo is a flower with five red and orange petals, but the yogurt company originally had two logos. The first logo was a flower with six petals, one for each of the six dairy co-ops, and the other logo was of a cow named Michonnette. Michonnette appeared supine on her back with her udders pointed up, milk spraying out of them and directly into Yoplait containers. For Yoplait's launch in 1965 in Paris, the company had a real cow representing Michonnette in the event's lobby.

Yoplait became widely available in the United States when William Bennet, the president and CEO of the Michigan Cottage Cheese Company, got the licensing rights to begin making and marketing Yoplait in the States in 1975. Bennet equipped his factory in Reed City, Michigan, to make and package yogurt, and soon he couldn't keep up with demand. In 1977, General Mills entered a franchise agreement to market Yoplait in the U.S. and acquired the Michigan Cottage Cheese Company's yogurt plant.

Yoplait invented drinkable yogurt in 1974, called Yop. The yogurt drink was a success in France, and it spread to the United Kingdom, Ireland, Belgium, Switzerland, Spain, and Canada. Yop is available in various flavors (such as strawberry, raspberry, and blueberry) depending on the country it's in, but it has limited availability in the U.S.

After videos of skunks getting their heads stuck in Yoplait containers were posted online, The Humane Society brought awareness to the problem. "The skunk that doesn't get found dies a horrible death. They suffocate because there's not much air in those cups. They may get hit by cars when they run across roadways," said Laura Simon of the Humane Society's Urban Wildlife Program. Because Yoplait containers have a uniquely narrow opening and wider base, skunks, squirrels, and other small animals searching for food can get their heads stuck in the containers.

After animal advocates petitioned General Mills to redesign Yoplait containers, the company added a warning—"protect wildlife; crush cup before disposal"—on the containers in 1998. Some animal advocates, though, didn't think the changes were enough to protect wildlife because the warning is in small print, the opening of the container is still narrow and the flange at the rim traps the animals, and crushing the cup is difficult.



In 1983, Yoplait got a mention in the film Mr. Mom. In the scene where Jack Butler (Michael Keaton) plays poker with a group of housewives, they don't use poker chips or money for betting. Instead, they use coupons for popular food products, including Domino's and Yoplait.

To capitalize on the popularity of Greek yogurt and compete with Greek yogurt companies such as Chobani and Fage, Yoplait created Plenti. A Greek yogurt, Plenti comes with whole grain oats, flaxseeds, and pepitas. To get customers excited about Plenti, Yoplait released commercials featuring a reworked version of "Down Under" by Men At Work. The early 1980s song originally featured the line "I said to the man, 'Are you trying to tempt me/Because I come from the land of plenty?'" in its third verse, but was rewritten new lyrics about oats, berries, peaches, pumpkin seeds, and cherries in the mythical Land of Plenti.

If you start your morning with a hearty breakfast, you’re in good company. Many of the greatest politicians, artists, and scientists from history were fueled by the most important meal of the day. And as you can see from the list below, their tastes were far from boring.

During his years living in exile on the island of Guernsey, Victor Hugo found inspiration for some of his most influential novels, including Les Misérables. The French author adopted a consistent writing routine while residing on the island. After waking up at sunrise, Hugo would slurp down a breakfast of two raw eggs and a cold cup of coffee before getting to work.

While Gandhi is most famous for fasting for long amounts of time, when he was living in London—several years before he began fasting—the civil rights leader started his day with a well-balanced meal. According to his journals he enjoyed a simple breakfast of porridge, goat's milk, and cocoa.

One of the most brilliant minds in history was fueled by a steady diet of eggs. In the book Einstein at Home, the physicist’s live-in housekeeper Herta Waldow recalled that "Herr Professor always ate fried eggs, at least two," almost every morning. At breakfast Einstein also enjoyed mushrooms ("He would probably have eaten mushrooms three times a day," according to Waldow) and honey. The latter was delivered to him by the pailful.

Walt Whitman was notorious for indulging in a meat-heavy diet throughout his lifetime. Even first thing in the morning, the American poet was known to enjoy a protein-rich meal of oysters and red meat. This was prior to the Paleo diet, when Whitman's belief that rare beef was a health food capable of curing pimples was far from mainstream. His dietary habits were a point of concern for his writer friend John Burroughs, and in 1885 he wrote Whitman, saying:

“I am almost certain you eat too heartily and make too much blood and fat. […] If not the engine makes too much steam, things become clogged and congested and the whole economy of the system deranged.”

Burroughs recommended he limit his meat intake to a little bit once a day and replace his fatty breakfast with cereals and fruit. According to the biography Walt Whitman: Song of Himself, the writer largely shrugged off his friend's advice.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart also had no trouble packing protein into his diet. Some of his favorite foods to eat included sturgeon, pork cutlets, and a Flemish beer-and-beef stew. The composer's carnivorous tendencies carried over into breakfast: In one letter to his wife, he wrote about having "just enjoying thoroughly my half of a capon which friend Primus has brought back with him" after waking up from a restful night’s sleep. Capons are hard to come by nowadays, but the large, neutered roosters were once considered a luxurious delicacy.

British prime minister Sir Winston Churchill understood the importance of a filling breakfast. He requested his morning meal to be served to him on two trays: one with toast, jam, butter, coffee, milk, a poached egg, and cold chicken (or other meats), and another with grapefruit, a sugar bowl, a glass of orange squash, and a whiskey soda. He punctuated the feast with a morning cigar.

Jane Austen began breakfast at a relatively later time than many of her creative counterparts, waiting until around 10 a.m. to eat. The writer’s breakfast of choice was a moist, dense pound cake served with tea.

Claude Monet’s appreciation for the finer things was evident in his diet. The painter grew his own produce, planned menus with the seasons, and kept food journals documenting his culinary habits. Before diving into his daily painting, Monet would sit down for an early breakfast of sausage, toast, jam, an herb omelet, and tea.

Queen Elizabeth I started her days with a meal worthy of her royal title. For breakfast, the monarch ate fine bread, ale, and a pottage (or stew) made from meat like beef or mutton cooked with grains. The dish was usually flavored with succory, an herb that tastes like dandelions.

Thomas Edison discovered his favorite breakfast food shortly after moving to New York. Broke and hungry, the 22-year-old wandered into a restaurant downtown looking to exchange a packet of tea for a hot apple dumpling and a cup of coffee. The humble meal was so satisfying to him at the time that it became his lifelong favorite dish.

Eggs are a breakfast staple for many, but sometimes the hit of protein can get a bit boring. Mix up your egg cooking routine by adding these fun items to your kitchen.

The world of novelty egg separators is surprisingly extensive. From farm animals to plants, you have your choice of charming, silicone suction cups. Regardless of design, they all work the same way: Crack an egg into a bowl and use the separator to suction out the yolk. Decide between a fish, frog, chicken, or cactus.

Freshly boiled eggs are pretty flexible and easy to mold into fun shapes. People have long been turning hard-boiled eggs into hearts with the help of a pencil, rubber band, and paper, but now we have molds to make the process a lot easier. This collection of plastic molds let you transform boring eggs into fun shapes and animals. To get started, peel a hard-boiled egg and stick it in the mold. Next, firmly close the mold and let it shape the egg. The molds also work for shaping sticky rice, making for some pretty impressive bento boxes. This set comes with six molds: a star, heart, car, bunny, bear, and fish.

Not interested in boiled eggs? You can also make your fried eggs in the shape of an animal. These silicone molds from Fred & Friends are shaped like everything from an owl to a skull, all with big yolk eyes. They take a little bit of skill and patience to get right, but once you figure it out, you're rewarded with a picture-perfect breakfast. We like the cat mold, but you can also get it in the shape of a dog, robot, skull, owl, or frog.

Making a breakfast sandwich at home might seem like a great money-saving idea, but after seeing all the dirty dishes it creates, you might end up right back at your local deli. Now you can make two breakfast sandwiches in five minutes using just once elaborate device. The lowest ring holds the bottom piece of bread (English muffin, bagel, biscuit, etc) along with toppings like any meats, cheeses, or vegetables. The middle ring holds the all-important egg. Finally, there's a space for the top piece of bread to complete the sandwich. Everything gets cooked at once, so the entire sandwich is ready to go. For speedy cleanup, the rings are machine-washable.

Another must-have for anyone who loves food but hates excessive dishes, this handy pan can tackle sausages, eggs, bacon, pancakes, and more all at once. The segmented pan also has even heat distribution and is oven- and dishwasher-safe, so it's both multi-functional and easy to clean.

Cracking eggs can be a pain, especially if you find yourself frequently fishing out bits of shell from the bowl. This invention aims to take the trouble out of egg cracking with a special handle—now you can crack and separate eggs with the push of a button! It has a little lever that pushes on the top of the egg and two holsters that pull the shell halves apart, letting the egg fall into the bowl or pan. There's also the option to add a small strainer underneath to catch yolks if you want to separate your eggs. At first glance, this hare-brained device looks too "As Seen on TV" to really work, but after watching a couple of videos of other people trying it out, we're completely sold.

If you enjoy foods on sticks and think eggs could use a bit of a fairground spin, then this device is just what you need in the kitchen. With the push of a button, the automatic cooker transforms raw eggs into … egg tubes. Simply crack two eggs into the cylindrical device and wait. Once your egg tube is ready, it'll slowly emerge from the top of the appliance. Stab it with a stick, and bam! You've got breakfast to go.

Get restaurant-quality deviled eggs with this easy plunger. The deviled filling can be made entirely using this one device—mash the yolks, blend in any mustard, mayonnaise, and spices, and gently press the top of the tube to create beautiful yellow swirls atop each egg.

OK, so you have a wishlist of amazing egg devices, but what are you going to make? That's where this attractive and helpful cookbook comes in. Egg: Recipes by Blanche Vaughan comes with 90 recipes dedicated to the versatile ingredient. The book even has a die-cut cover of an egg cross-section, so even if you don't use it often, it'll look great on your coffee table.

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A version of this article first ran in 2017. It has been updated to reflect current availability as of June 2019.

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